Lisa Granata

paintings

Artist statement

The role of the artist I now understood as that of revealing through the world-surfaces the implicit forms of the soul, and the great agent to assist the artist was the myth. 
- JOSEPH CAMPBELL

The purpose of my paintings is to engage the viewer in social and political topics. Social themes in my work have ranged from gender to generative and destructive forces in humanity and in nature, and the individual versus the community. The political topics I have investigated are science and nature specifically: climate change, loss of habitat, deforestation, the loss of species. In each of these series of works, I represent these concepts with my personal set of evolving iconography and images. As Joseph Campbell stated the artist is the modern day myth maker. I use iconography in my work to create my mythology.  The compositions in my works organized with overlapping personal symbolic icons and combined with images from nature. The paintings may be viewed as a puzzle; the observer can derive their own message from analyzing the separate iconic elements and making sense of the whole.

I find inspiration for my work from a variety of influences and experiences such as literature, language, mythology, current events, historical and contemporary artworks, and through my travels.  My art has been influenced by the abstract expressionist for its expressive qualities and processes and for the celebration of the plastics. I am also attracted to symbolic and metaphoric nature of Renaissance art. 

The processes and techniques I use to generate my paintings are layering of drawing, paint, collage and screened or printed images. The painterly consistency used can range from juicy and highly varnished mediums to actual texture & impasto to thin glazes of transparent layers. I use graphic images , which appear flat contrasted with images with three dimensional illusionist depictions to describe the subject. This intermixing between flat graphic elements and the appearance of three-dimensional illusion of form.