About Collective Marks

Ten visual artists from Southeastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island came together in the spring of 2014 to start an informal critique group. Six months later, we had a name: Collective Marks.

Providing each other with support, encouragement, and a critical eye, our members include digital artists, painters, printmakers, mixed media artists, sculptors, and photographers. We meet monthly in an atmosphere of collegial give-and-take, fostering artistic growth through supportive critiques and the sharing of information about process as well as exhibition opportunities.

Collective Marks members: Susan Clarke, Joan Croce, Connie Babian Grab, Lisa Granata, Celeste Houle, Matt Jemison, Carolyn Letvin, George Lowell, Tracey Maroni, Ray Scanlon, Jean Thompson, Andrea Warner, and Mary Wojciechowski.  

 

 

         past events  September 2017 Collective Marks Group exhibit: SPACE The Preservation Framer, North Attleboro, MA "Space is the breath of art. " —Frank Lloyd Wright In this exhibition by members of the Collective Marks artists’ collaborative, eleven artists explore the concept of space in their work, and they invite you to do the same.  This kind of space is not a place, but a vital something (or perhaps a vital nothing?) that can animate a composition and breathe life into it. The negative, or “empty” space around a flower or a figure is as essential to the composition as the flower or figure itself. The spatial relationships of different elements to each other as well as to the space defined by the frame will affect each viewer’s interpretation of the artwork.   

 



 

past events
September 2017
Collective Marks Group exhibit: SPACE
The Preservation Framer, North Attleboro, MA
"Space is the breath of art. " —Frank Lloyd Wright
In this exhibition by members of the Collective Marks artists’
collaborative, eleven artists explore the concept of space in their work,
and they invite you to do the same.

This kind of space is not a place, but a vital something (or perhaps a
vital nothing?) that can animate a composition and breathe life into it.
The negative, or “empty” space around a flower or a figure is as essential
to the composition as the flower or figure itself. The spatial
relationships of different elements to each other as well as to the space
defined by the frame will affect each viewer’s interpretation of the
artwork.